History

The Manggha Museum of Japanese Art and Technology, created on the initiative of Andrzej Wajda and opened in 1994 as the Manggha Centre of Japanese Art and Technology, was a branch of the National Museum in Krakow for ten years, and at the same time the venue of the proactive activities of the Andrzej Wajda and Krystyna Zachwatowicz Kyoto–Krakow Foundation. In 2005, the Decision of the Minister of Culture granted the Manggha autonomy, changing its status to that of a state cultural institution, and since 2007 it has operated as a museum.

In accordance with the Founders’ idea, the Manggha was intended as the ‘home for the collection of Japanese art’ amassed mostly by Feliks ‘Manggha’ Jasieński, and from 1920 kept at the National Museum in Krakow. The Collection of Far Eastern Art of the National Museum in Krakow was definitively deposited with the Manggha Museum in 2009.
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1920

Gift of Feliks Jasieński

Gift of Feliks Jasieński

The Polish collector and connoisseur of art, Feliks ‘Manggha’ Jasieński, donates his collection of over 15,000 items to the National Museum in Krakow.
Photo: National Museum in Krakow

1944

Manggha: the beginnings

Manggha: the beginnings

Japanese art in Krakow under Nazi German occupation
A portion of Jasieński’s collection is exhibited for the first time at the Cloth Hall Gallery, where it is viewed by a nineteen-year-old Andrzej Wajda.

1987

Kyoto Prize

Kyoto Prize

Andrzej Wajda receives the Inamori Foundation’s Kyoto Prize. The artist uses the whole cash prize to found the Kyoto–Krakow Foundation, whose object is to erect a building that will become the home of Feliks Jasieński’s collection.

1991

Fundraising

Fundraising

The fundraising campaign to build the Manggha Centre is joined by the East Japan Railway Workers’ Union.

1992

Design

Design

The architectural concept design was prepared by the prominent Japanese architect Arata Isozaki, in collaboration with Krakow architects: Krzysztof Ingarden, Jacek Ewý, and JET Atelier.

1993

28 maja
Cornerstone

Cornerstone

The cornerstone ceremony initiating the construction of the Centre featured a blessing by Shinto priests.

1993

2 lipca
Construction begins

Construction begins

The construction of the Centre involves over five hundred works, who contribute more than 300,000 hours and complete the project on schedule.

1994

30 listopada
Manggha/Manga/Manggha

Manggha/Manga/Manggha

Opening of the Centre of Japanese Art and Technology
The poster announcing the event shows Feliks ‘Manggha’ Jasieński against the Manggha Centre building placed in the background, holding under his arm a print by Katsushika Hokusai, known for his book of drawings Manga – in Jasieński’s time transliterated into French as Manggha.

2002

11.07.2002
Visit of the Imperial Couple

Visit of the Imperial Couple

The Museum is visited by the Japanese Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko.

2005

2005 – 2007
Autonomy and independence

Autonomy and independence

In 2005 Manggha ceases to be a branch of the National Museum and is granted the status of state cultural institution, followed by independent museum status in 2007.

2014

New construction project

New construction project

Europe–Far East Gallery
In June, the cornerstone ceremony inaugurates the construction of the Europe–Far East Gallery.

2015

23.06.2015
Opening of the Europe–Far East Gallery

Opening of the Europe–Far East Gallery

An annexe to the Manggha Museum complex, the Gallery building comprises exhibition rooms, a conference room, storage rooms, specialist workrooms and office spaces.
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